OpenBSD also on Notebook as Dual Boot

I had left some part of the hard disk free to try installing OpenBSD on my IBM Thinkpad R52 later. The later is now. I had some respect for trying the dual boot as last time I tried it was a mess. I now have working OpenBSD on sixth partition. That means if you read this I can confirm you can boot OpenBSD starts also from an extended partition. So my layout seen from Linux was a sda1(Ubuntu /boot)-sda5(Ubuntu SWAP). sda4 was the extended partition. I now did this:

  1. Add a sixth and seventh partition from Ubuntu (/dev/sda6) – sda7 is OpenBSD SWAP.
  2. Mark the sda6 as partition type “a6” for OpenBSD.
  3. Download a fresh OpenBSD install CD from snapshots.
  4. Start (I)nstalling but do not use the whole disk.
  5. OpenBSD thinks the partition name should be wd0a.
  6. Ok, go through the setup steps – I very much use all file sets as I think installing them later would be more troublesome. OpenBSD already is small (228 MB install CD)
  7. When all is finished you can reboot. I do not tell you how to install OpenBSD – read the FAQ – its good – also INSTALL.linux – but dont take that as a bible. Actually you should understand at least some of the stuff – sure you cant understand the whole FAQ. My suggesttion with starting with OpenBSD is to play with it – read the FAQ and repeat steps – if you come from Linux do not hurry. Take your time. Give yourself a break!
  8. Next step is the ‘evil’ GRUB. In the INSTALL.linux you will find an example which contains a line “makeactive”. Actuall you do neither need that – it will also break the boot process. As the GRUB docs state: “This command is limited to primary PC partitions on a hard disk.” – This means that does not work for extended partitions where I have my OpenBSD on. If you use Ubuntu there is a passage where Ubuntu autoupdates Linux kernels. I suggest adding the OpenBSD at the very much bottom below
    I had left some part of the hard disk free to try installing OpenBSD on my IBM Thinkpad R52 later. The later is now. I had some respect for trying the dual boot as last time I tried it was a mess. I now have working OpenBSD on sixth partition. That means if you read this I can confirm you can boot OpenBSD starts also from an extended partition. So my layout seen from Linux was a sda1(Ubuntu /boot)-sda5(Ubuntu SWAP). sda4 was the extended partition. I now did this:
  9. Add a sixth and seventh partition from Ubuntu (/dev/sda6) – sda7 is OpenBSD SWAP.
  10. Mark the sda6 as partition type “a6” for OpenBSD.
  11. Download a fresh OpenBSD install CD from snapshots.
  12. Start (I)nstalling but do not use the whole disk.
  13. OpenBSD thinks the partition name should be wd0a.
  14. Ok, go through the setup steps – I very much use all file sets as I think installing them later would be more troublesome. OpenBSD already is small (228 MB install CD)
  15. When all is finished you can reboot. I do not tell you how to install OpenBSD – read the FAQ – its good – also INSTALL.linux – but dont take that as a bible. Actually you should understand at least some of the stuff – sure you cant understand the whole FAQ. My suggesttion with starting with OpenBSD is to play with it – read the FAQ and repeat steps – if you come from Linux do not hurry. Take your time. Give yourself a break!
  16. Next step is the ‘evil’ GRUB. In the INSTALL.linux you will find an example which contains a line “makeactive”. Actuall you do neither need that – it will also break the boot process. As the GRUB docs state: “This command is limited to primary PC partitions on a hard disk.” – This means that does not work for extended partitions where I have my OpenBSD on. If you use Ubuntu there is a passage in ‘menu.lst’ where Ubuntu autoupdates Linux kernels. I suggest adding the OpenBSD at the very much bottom below:
    ### END DEBIAN AUTOMAGIC KERNELS LIST.
    And put something like this there. AGAIN: Think before you just copy and paste. If your setup is different it will not work:
    title OpenBSD
    root (hd0,5,a)
    chainloader +1

That should be it. I guess Debian should work exactly the same. Personally I think those autoupdating of menu.lst is stupid. You can imagine how delighted i was as I realised that the “makeactive” was actually the problem. I tried nearly everything before finding that all. And now I share. Not that OpenBSD is good for dual boot – but maybe many of you like me like to have a Linux as a backup system while we are progressing in how we can use OpenBSD.

As this post is already a little long I will talk about the new OpenBSD WPA wireless on my next post.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Free Software, Linux, OpenBSD, Technology

2 responses to “OpenBSD also on Notebook as Dual Boot

  1. Pingback: And X11/Xorg with OpenBSD « VincisBlog

  2. nice tutorial.. good luck 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s